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News and Reports

Current Technology Matters - items of topical interest related to technology in South Asia

SARID Technology Activities - Particulars of SARID activities in the intermediate technology field

Appropriate Technology Sectors - articles on major technology-related sectors relevant to South Asia

Country Technology Profiles - technological data, policy, projects and articles particular to individual nations

Critical Issues - articles featuring major developmental concerns relevant to South Asia

Other Technology Resources - news sources & organisations relevant to technology in general


HIGH TECH IS NOT CLEAN (Sarid) - Contrary to hype, high tech products are not small and harmless, but contain non-renewables and dangerous metals. Their ncreasing numbers, short  lives and low recycle rates generate about 50 million tons of electronic waste  worldwide annually. Now delegates at a recently conference on hazardous waste  have pledged to create pilot "take-back programs" that would encourage manufacturers to recycle or dispose safely of electronic products once they were no longer usable. They also agreed to fight the illegal movement of such waste ... Full Article

SNIFFER BEES SMELL BOMBS (Sarid) - Bees have an extraordinary sense of smell, developed to find pollen in the wild. Now this ability has been harnessed by British scientists to detect explosives. Honeybees can be trained in much the same way dogs are: through rewards. A bee will stick out its proboscis – its tongue or feeding organ - when it smells something it likes. Scientists exposed bees to the odor of a particular explosive, giving sugar water when it reacted positively. The bees soon learnt to stick out their tongues in anticipation at the smell of the explosive ... Full Article

HELPING AMERICANS UNDERSTAND INDIANS (Sarid) - The average US American’s culturally-conditioned unwillingness to understand English spoken by foreigners, though not apparently, fellow countrymen, is a major problem for companies wanting to increase profits by outsourcing telemarketing services to countries with low cost, skilled labor ... Full Article

THE YEAR IN ENERGY TECHNOLOGY REVIEW (Massachusetts Institute of Technology Technology Review) - A look back at advances in renewable energy technologies during 2006: Reducing costs of converting wood chips and switch grass to fuels; mainstreaming hybrid plug-in cars; making long-life lithium-ion batteries that don't explode; and developing better production methods to get cheap energy from the sun. Unfortunately, much energy policy is geared towards coal as a cheap source ... Full Article

CLEANING UP WATER WITH NANOMAGNETS (MIT Technology Review) - It may seem an unlikely way to clean up drinking water, but scientists at Rice University, in Houston, have found that nanoparticles of rust can be used to remove arsenic with a simple wave of a magnet ... Full Article

TECHNOLOGICAL CHALLENGES TO IMPLEMENTING AN AFFORDABLE HOUSING POLICY (SARID Journal) - In a series of papers, the author, who is an architect and a civil engineer, discusses some of the fundamentals behind the housing crisis in South Asia. Rather than dealing with the better-known socio-economic factors, that are pertinent and central to affordability, the author concentrates on the technological and engineering challenges to creating a viable and cost-effective building prototype ... Full Article

HIGH TECH IS NOT CLEAN (Sarid) - Contrary to hype, high tech products are not small and harmless, but contain non-renewables and dangerous metals. Their ncreasing numbers, short  lives and low recycle rates generate about 50 million tons of electronic waste  worldwide annually. Now delegates at a recently conference on hazardous waste  have pledged to create pilot "take-back programs" that would encourage manufacturers to recycle or dispose safely of electronic products once they were no longer usable. They also agreed to fight the illegal movement of such waste ... Full Article

SEISMICALLY RESPONSIVE LOW-COST HOUSING (South Asian Press) - SARID's executive director, Javed Sultan who is also an architect and civil engineer, was in Pakistan recently to offer his assistance with cheap, safe housing for the earthquake victims. DAWN Reporter, Sher Baz Khan's interview with him and report follows ... Full Article

GOOGLE LOOKS TO SOLAR POWER, by Janaki Blum: Google Inc. is worried about energy costs. Whereas the performance of the Internet search leader’s computing infrastructure has nearly doubled over the last three generations, performance per watt of server hardware remained nearly unchanged, so that electricity consumption has almost doubled as well. Last year, company engineers warned that without intervention, the power costs of running computers could overtake initial hardware outlays by the end of the decade ... Full article

THE ASCENT OF WIND POWER, By Keith Bradsher, The New York Times: Wind power may still have an image as something of a plaything of environmentalists more concerned with clean energy than saving money. But it is quickly emerging as a serious alternative not just in affluent areas of the world but in fast-growing countries like India and China that are avidly seeking new energy sources. And leading the charge here in west-central India and elsewhere is an unlikely champion, Suzlon Energy, a homegrown Indian company Full Article




Current Technology Matters

ENERGY: Solar Sunny Days, Technology Review, September 2005
Solar energy is finally getting its day in the sun, buoyed by renewable-energy incentives and snowballing economies of scale. Former Stanford University professor Dick Swanson, the founder and CTO of Sunnyvale, CA-based SunPower, says there's still an important place for the industry's incumbent technology: crystalline silicon.

TRANSPORTATION: Biodiesel, a New Way of Turning Plants into Fuel, Technology Review, June 7, 2005
A promising new process could be a significant step toward turning the dream of driving without contributing to global warming into a reality.

ENERGY/TRANSPORTATION: Fuel for the New Millenium, Technology Review, May 23, 2005.
As a future fuel source, hydrogen inspires a lot of hope -- and more than a little wariness. A new hydrogen-powered fuel cell technology for portable devices may be as safe and even longer-lasting than today's batteries.

ENERGY: Microhydro Plants Can Provide Cheap Power to Villagers,

ENERGY: UN finds Solar, Wind Energy Potential in Developing Countries, UN, April 14, 2005
Thousands of megawatts of new renewable energy potential in Africa, Asia, South and Central America have been discovered by the pioneering Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) project to map the solar and wind resource of 13 developing countries.

WATER: Move for Eco-Friendly Desalination System. Financial Times Information, April 28, 2005.
The desalination system uses a solar-driven, low-pressure distillation process.

GENERAL: Ten Technologies that Refuse to Die, by By Eric Scigliano: These technologies fill real needs that their more sophisticated successors don't.

 

 


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